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Crowd-funding may seem out on the financial fringe to most advisers, an activity not worth their time and effort. But its popularity is soaring as new platforms emerge for this form of private investing, and advisers would do well to prepare themselves, says Kelly Rodriques. He runs a San Francisco-based trust company that handles custody of non-traded assets for self-directed IRAs. Writing on Wealth Adviser at WSJ.com, he predicts that, if they aren't already, clients will be coming in and asking for the adviser's opinion about putting money into something like an energy drink or a new healthy mac and cheese for kids. If the adviser isnt informed, then the client will make the decision based on their own understanding of the investment, he warns. That's a situation you want to avoid.

MANAGING THE MONEY:

Getting, and keeping, clients off the sidelines. Before the 2008-2009 financial crisis, clients had pretty much one concern: how to boost returns. Now, getting them to invest requires a different messageand some education in the risks of being too conservative, says Scott Farber, senior vice president and wealth strategist for US Trust in Miami. Once they understand what the product or strategy is, they can start making educated decisions, he tells CNBC.

One safe place to invest money? If someone asked you to suggest a safe place to invest money for the next 10 years, what would you say? In a video by Wealth Adviser at WSJ.com, New York-based adviser Karen Altfest gives her concise answer: There is no one best place to put money. Her advice is to, among other things, invest no more than 5% in any one asset.

THE PRACTICE:

Fulfilling a dead clients wish. Before dying, a client told Florida-based adviser Bill Carr hed decided not to have his two children be trustees of his estate. But he never told his lawyer to make that change, and it fell to Carr to persuade his family to honor that wish. It was a delicate business, he tells Wealth Adviser at WSJ.com, and taught him a lesson: In future dealings with clients, hell really push them to make the changes they want, even if it risks the relationship.

Its how you say it. A marketing firm that helps craft politicians messages is being used by wealth management firms to ensure they use client-friendly language, Reuters says. Rather than risk tolerance, for example, advisers should talk about a "comfort level." And in reviewing alternative investments, its better to speak of "goals-based strategies than "risk-based strategies.

THE BUSINESS:

Robo advisers will change, not replace, humans. Online services wont replace human advisers, says United Capitals Joe Duran. People need human help when there is complexity, or when the cost of being wrong is too high, he writes on Investment News. But robo-advisers will have an impact on pricing, help to spread knowledge, and oblige successful firms to create a platform that can delicately balance the use of people and technology.

The Wealth Adviser briefing covers topics of special interest to wealth managers, financial planners and other advisers. It's delivered to subscribers by email each workday morning. If you haven't done so already, you can sign up for it here: http://on.wsj.com/WealthAdviserSignup)

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Football has huge finances, which is why half the Big West programs cut theirs. UCSB took their football field and turned it into a soccer field and have won national championships, but they didnt invest money into it until much later, after that first championship.

Nic: Speaking of soccer. Lets not forget, an offer to have the $10 million cost of an indoor facility covered was rejected by university officials, supposedly because the strategic plan review wasnt done. Not long after, they accepted $1.5 million towards their new soccer stadium - when that same review still wasnt done.

Will Butler: Yeah, thats just a bad administrative move. UAB is a unique combination of bad administration and open interference by Power Five program interests.

UTSA is a good example of the opposite. Theyre under a larger umbrella, but theirs is still a successful venture because the UT system is willing to put money into the program and doesnt feel threatened by them. Hell, the UT system is exploring giving Rio Grande Valley a football team.

Theres kind of a gentlemens agreement around here that a board of regents does not interfere with any program, regardless of size. Sam Houston State is in the Texas State University system, and they wont get any interference from San Marcos if they ever decide to try and go FBS. Texas doesnt screw with UTSA or UTEP; all they do is force schools under their umbrella to have orange as one of their school colors. Small price to pay. It works.

The Texas State board had a big fight ten years ago about trying to get Lamar, SHSU, etc., to standardize their names to Texas State-Beaumont, Huntsville, etc. But theyve never messed with the football programs to my knowledge. The board was even supportive of Lamar starting football back up in FCS, and they have a nice 15,000-seat stadium now.

Chris: Thats similar to the California State University system. Despite Long Beach State, Cal State Fullerton and Cal State Northridge shutting their programs down, you still have San Jose State, San Diego State, and Fresno in FBS plus Cal Poly and Sacramento State in FCS.  Once again, it comes back to this argument of whos lobbying to get money and whos trying to screw who over.

Aman: I just hate the way conference realignment has affected perceptions. Power 5 is now a term regularly used; I do it myself, but its not a real thing. Purdue isnt better than Boise State or Colorado State. A lot of really mediocre schools have skated by offering no football value to their conference, and it looks like they are the ones who will benefit most from the recent changes in college sports - stipends, autonomy, etc. - at the expense of the plucky mid-majors who have done more with less.

UConn, for instance, has been a basketball powerhouse for a long time and actually has a history of football success. They made it to a BCS bowl, convoluted though that trip may have been, but it just doesnt matter as we learned the hard way. Schools can come out of nowhere in football too, its just that sports fans have the memory of goldfish. Nobody seems to remember that Baylor and Oregon used to be nothing.

Nic: Yeah. Florida State, too, before Bobby Bowden arrived back in the day. I mean, realistically this is true across the board. Every single Somebody was a Nobody at some point.

Will: Its all about administrative support in my mind. Texas State tried to move to FBS in 2000, but things stalled when Jim Wacker died and the current president was installed, who is rumored to be apathetic at best about athletics. She put the brakes on the process until the students forced her hand after the 2005 playoff run.

Realistically, if Nicholls State can have a football team, albeit FCS, anyone can have a football team. They are the definition of broke. Their program is held together by duct tape and paper clips, but they survive. Their stadium is a dump, and they took a huge hit to the program after Katrina. They go 1-10 every year, but they still survive because damn it, its Louisiana and they want football.

I think when any team shuts down, its due to either mismanagement from Title IX or lack of investment in the program. Administrative support is the biggest key, and geography is second. Football can survive with a strong administration in the south.

Chris: I agree; lack of administrative support is a dangerous thing, football or not.

Will: I think UAB could have thrived with an admin that actually wanted them to exist.

Chris: UABSOLUTELY.

*drops mic*



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